SMS Connects

April 2018

April 2018

 

2018 Awards Ceremony

On Monday, April 16, 2018, Arizona State University's School of Molecular Sciences held its annual award and recognition ceremony for outstanding students, research and teaching assistants, faculty members, and their families at Old Main on ASU's Tempe campus. The ceremony recognized undergraduate and graduate students who excelled in academics and research, distinguished instructors and faculty, and spring 2018 PhD and MS graduates. Awards were presented by faculty members selected by each recipient, and presenters took the opportunity to highlight the many accomplishments of their respective students.

This year, SMS introduced several new scholarships, including the John Holloway Memorial Undergraduate and Graduate Scholarships, the Edward B. Skibo Memorial Scholarship, and the forthcoming SMS Innovation Award. In addition, SMS announced the inaugural recipients of its Women in Science and First Generation Scholarships. This year, two SMS students, Meilin Zhu and Humza Zubair, were also awarded the prestigious Barry Goldwater Scholarship.

Read more about the ceremony, including a full list of recipients here.

You can also view all the pictures from this event in our Facebook album here.

Sun Devil Giving Day 2018 Wrap-up

Once again, we here at SMS want to give our sincere thanks to everyone who participated in this year's Sun Devil Giving Day event, whether on campus or online. Every donation made on that day goes directly to our most deserving students. Linda Raish, Director of Development for the Natural Sciences from ASU's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, reflected that "This was the best year ever for SMS, and many thanks to everyone who contributed!"

Only your support can guarantee the continued success of our awards and scholarships, which greatly benefit our students in their quest to become future molecular scientists who change the world.

If you are curious about some of our current awardees, you can revisit the opening section of this month's newsletters to read their stories and view their photos. To learn more about our scholarships, you can visit: sms.asu.edu/giving.

For our alumni who donated on March 22nd, we will be drawing ten winners, who will each receive two (2) movie tickets. Please check your email and look out for a message from SMS within the next two weeks.

SMS Women in Science Project

The first ever recipient of the SMS Women in Science scholarship has been announced. Many congratulations to Madeleine Howell, a chemistry junior making amazing contributions to molecular science! Madeleine plans to go to graduate school and earn her PhD in physical or materials chemistry. After graduate school, her goals are to either pursue a career in academia or work in industry/government R&D. 

Madeleine says, "I am very honored to be the first recipient of the SMS Women in Science Scholarship. Receiving this award has made me reflect on the gender disparity in STEM and the importance of my success as a female scientist. This has motivated me to work even harder to achieve my academic and career goals so that one day I may be a role model for other aspiring female chemists. I believe that supporting the achievements of women in science is critical to increasing female representation in STEM and it is inspiring to be a part of a school that recognizes this. I would not be where I am today without the generous support of the School and the SMS faculty."

Over the past few months, we have worked hard to raise awareness about women in science and this scholarship in particular, and we want to say a heartfelt THANK YOU for your participation and support.

If you have not yet seen our video feature highlighting many of our wonderful female graduates, you can watch and share it here: https://youtu.be/Pj3dimIeAKo

 

 

We are continuing to feature photos and stories in our Facebook Women in Science series here: 
https://www.facebook.com/pg/ASUChemistry/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1135420826560849
Learn more about the SMS Women in Science scholarship here.
Meet Ara Austin, SMS Chemical Education Star!

 

Ara Austin

Just last fall, ASU’s School of Molecular Sciences launched the very first fully online degree program in biochemistry from an accredited institution in the U.S. SMS’ online degree program takes a big step in leveling the playing field for non-traditional students interested in pursuing a wide range of careers in science and health.

This spring, the SMS online degree program welcomed its newest member, chemical education specialist Dr. Ara Austin. Although this is her first semester with SMS as Clinical Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Online Programs, Ara is a familiar face in the Physical Sciences building on ASU Tempe campus, where the School of Molecular Sciences is housed, having completed both her BS in biochemistry with minors in communications studies and psychology and, more recently, her PhD in chemical education at ASU.


Originally from Seoul, South Korea, Ara was just one month into her freshman year at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln when somebody side-swiped her car on the interstate. She had a near-death experience when her vehicle flipped three times; doctors told Ara she might never walk again, having broken her back and both her legs in the accident. Because of her extensive injuries, including some memory loss, Ara took some time off from school and returned to South Korea. After Ara’s recovery, her desire for a fresh start to her academic career brought her to Arizona State University, where she has happily remained ever since.

Ara says, “ASU is different because it gave me so much academic freedom...As long as a student stays proactive about his or her goals, many people here will provide encouragement.” In her new role, Ara is focused on ensuring the success of SMS’ very first cohort of fully online biochemistry students.

If you are interested in the School of Molecular Sciences, ASU Online, or the online biochemistry degree program, you can find out more information at:

 https://sms.asu.edu

We here at SMS love Ara and sincerely hope that you enjoyed reading about her storyTo read more stories about members of the SMS community, click here.

Research Highlights

    • In a major advancement in nanomedicine, Arizona State University scientists, in collaboration with researchers from the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, have successfully programmed nanorobots to shrink tumors by cutting off their blood supply. “We have developed the first fully autonomous, DNA robotic system for a very precise drug design and targeted cancer therapy,” said Hao Yan, director of the ASU Biodesign Institute’s Center for Molecular Design and Biomimetics and the Milton Glick Professor in the School of Molecular Sciences. The successful demonstration of the technology, the first-of-its-kind study in mammals utilizing breast-cancer, melanoma, ovarian and lung-cancer mouse models, was published in the journal Nature Biotechnology.

 

    • Timothy Steimle's research group has received significant funding for several projects. The National Science Foundation (Division of Astronomical Sciences) has funded Prof. Steimle’s group for the project entitled “Laboratory measurement of electrostatic and magnetostatic properties of stellar and circumstellar molecules”. The U.S. Department of Energy (Heavy Elements Program of the Basic Energy Sciences Division) has funded Prof. Steimle’s group for the project entitled “Characterization of Gas-phase Uranium and Thorium Containing Molecules via Optical Stark, Zeeman, and Microwave Spectroscopy”. The Heising-Simons Foundation has funded Prof. Steimle’s group for the project “Identification and Characterization of Ephemeral Molecules Relevant to Fundamental Physics”. 

 

  • On April 10, Gary Moore was awarded the 2018 Laboratory Safety Innovation Award to honor his innovations in safe science at the Tempe campus’ University Club. This was the inaugural year for the award, sponsored by ASU’s Laboratory Safety Committee in partnership with the office of Knowledge Enterprise Development and Environmental Health and Safety. The award was designed to highlight ASU’s dedication to safe science, recognizing a principal investigator for implementing an innovative safety program in an ASU research lab.

 

Sun Devil Service Awards

Every year, SMS recognizes its long-time employees’ milestone anniversaries at the Sun Devil Award for Service luncheon. This length of service award recognizes our staff, faculty and academic professionals for continued commitment to ASU and to the School of Molecular Sciences.  

2018 Sun Devil Award for Service Recipients

This year SMS is recognizing the following members of its community:

For 35 years: Thomas Groy
For 30 years: Neal Woodbury
For 25 years: John Kouvetakis
For 15 years: Petra Fromme, Giovanna Ghirlanda, Grant Baugardner, Raimund Fromme
For 10 years: Shelly Hauck, James Klemaszewski, Kirstin Hendrickson, Jennifer Green, Alexandra Ros, Daniel Buttry, Kevin Redding, Waunita Parrill, Amber Soergel, Jun-Ping Xu
For 5 years: Mary Ann Bucciarelli, Timothy Lamb, Smitha Pillai, Rene Hernandez, Nicole Ray, Beatriz Smith

Congratulations to our Director, Neal Woodbury, for an impressive 30 years of service at ASU. Without the loyalty and excellence of our community members, SMS would not be the amazing center of education, research, and collaboration that it is today!

SMS Openings

 

 

As always, all job postings from faculty positions, instructor positions, student jobs, to non-ASU positions are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.

 

 

Have you heard about ASU's Sun Devil Rewards app? Use this loyalty app to earn Pitchforks you can redeem for VIP tickets to athletics and arts events, only-at-ASU experiences, exclusive Sun Devil merchandise and more. Download the app from the App Store or Google Play, or find out more here.

Please feel free to contact Mary Zhu via email at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!

 

March 2018

March 2018

SMS Connects March 2018

What Would You Give To?

Dear Sun Devil,

When you look back fondly on your time as a student at the School of Molecular Sciences, what stands out to you the most? Is it ASU's beautiful campus? Your time in the labs and classrooms? Or is it your fellow classmates and students, some of whom you might now call a friend for life?

At SMS, we believe that our students, who, after graduation, go on to represent the School in all corners of the world, are our most important community members.

On March 22nd, you can show your support for your alma mater and the young students who are following in your footsteps down the path of molecular science.

Sun Devil Giving Day 2018 is March 22nd. Are you ready?

Click below to see messages from SMS faculty

https://youtu.be/VCbrTRX9gCo

SMS Faculty Message

SMS Women in Science Project

We want to say a heartfelt THANK YOU from the School of Molecular Sciences for your participation in our on-going Women in Science project. Months in the making, our video feature highlighting many of our wonderful female graduates, including you, is now live!

Watch and share this video:

https://youtu.be/Pj3dimIeAKo

SMS Women in Science

We have also been regularly featuring some of your photos and stories on our Facebook Women in Science series here:
https://www.facebook.com/pg/ASUChemistry/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1135420826560849

Events

  • On February 24, the School of Molecular Sciences participated in ASU’s Open Door event. Glassblower Christi Roeger was there demonstrating her fire art, along with Scott Sayres and undergrads' musical flame thrower with various optics, as well as chemistry demos with Klem and the Science is Fun and SAACS students. Some photos of the event are on our Facebook here.

  • Again, the Spring 2018 Eyring Lecture will be happening in March. The Spring 2018 speaker is Professor David Baker from the University of Washington. The title of his General Lecture is "Prediction and Design of Protein Structures and Functions" and it will be held on March 29, 2018, 6:30pm in PS H151. The title of his Technical Lecture is "The Coming of Age of De Novo Protein Design" and will be held on March 30, 2018. You can learn more about Professor Baker and his work here.

  • Sun Devil Giving Day is here! SDGD 2018 will be on Thursday, March 22nd, 2018. One of the most important days of the year, Sun Devil Giving Day is Arizona State University’s university-wide day of giving. When you give through ASU you are providing the resources necessary for our faculty, students, and researchers to solve the greatest issues facing our world today. The strength of our community is what makes the School of Molecular Sciences the best of the best, and we encourage all our community members to show their love for SMS on March 22nd! More details about #SunDevilGiving are below.

Sun Devil Giving Day is March 22nd, 2018

What is it? Sun Devil Giving Day is the annual university-wide day to donate support to our most deserving students. This year it is on Thursday, March 22nd, 12 a.m. to 11:59 p.m., MST.

Where does the money go? You can donate to many different programs and funds across ASU, but most of us will choose to give specifically to the School of Molecular Sciences funds. These are:

  • SMS Women in Science Scholarship fund
  • SMS First Generation Scholarship fund
  • SMS Veterans Scholarship fund
  • SMS Scholarship fund
  • SMS General fund

You can choose to contribute to one of these funds, or you can split your contribution between two of them, or you can contribute to them all!

All of the money you contribute to a scholarship fund goes directly to the students, there is no overhead! Contributing on Sun Devil Giving Day has the most impact. You can give as much or as little as you like, $5 - $5000, every donation makes a difference. Remember, 100% of your gift goes directly to the deserving scholarship recipients.

How do I donate? We will send a direct link to donate via email on Giving Day itself.

Research Highlights

Alumni Profiles

We have recently run a series of profiles on four graduates of the School of Molecular Sciences. Read more to find out about what our community members have been up to since finishing their undergraduate careers! You can click on their individual names or photos to view each of their full-length profiles.

Kaitlyn Mandigo

Kaitlyn MandigoKaitlyn Mandigo graduated from Arizona State University with a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 2016. While at ASU, Kaitlyn won the Distinguished Teaching Assistant Award in spring 2016. She has two amazing boys, and is an active Cub Scout and choir mom. Since graduating from ASU, Kaitlyn has been teaching sixth- and seventh-grade chemistry at BASIS Scottsdale.

 

Havell Markus Havell Markus

Havell Markus received his Bachelor of Science degree in biochemistry and mathematics from Arizona State University in 2016. As a highly accomplished student of ASU’s Barrett, the The Honors College, Havell received the School of Molecular Sciences Dean’s Medal in fall 2016. He is currently attending University of Cambridge for a master’s degree in computational biology. Havell wants to pursue a future as a physician scientist, and envisions genomics to be a greater part of medicine in the future, as we are beginning to uncover the genetic links to many diseases. 

Lyndsay HessLyndsay Hess

Lyndsay Hess graduated from Arizona State University with degrees in biochemistry and psychology in 2015. Lyndsay has a long-standing interest in studying the human body and plans to become a physician. Since graduating, she has worked as an inorganic chemist, ocular recovery technician, and a medical scribe. Lyndsay is currently in the process of moving to Tucson, where she will be attending medical school at the University of Arizona. She also has an infant daughter and is getting married at the end of March 2018.

Ryan Muller Ryan Muller

Ryan Muller graduated from ASU with a Bachelor of Science degree in medicinal biochemistry with a focus on molecular biosciences and biotechnology in 2015. Ryan is currently a third-year graduate student in University of California-Berkeley's molecular and cell biology program. Ryan is broadly interested in RNA biology and specifically studies mRNA translation regulation and ribosome quality control. He uses a combination of classic biochemistry and computational methods in his research.

SMS Students are Amazing!

Did you know that we also published a series of profiles on some of our amazing undergraduate students in the molecular sciences? You can read some interesting stories about six of our current students, Sidney Covarrubias, Jacob Jordan, McKenna Renfro, Adam Samuel, Shannon Sipes, and Logan Tegler, on our Facebook or our Undergraduate Experience page.

SMS Openings

As always, all job postings from faculty positions, instructor positions, student jobs, to non-ASU positions are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.

Have you heard about ASU's Sun Devil Rewards app? Use this loyalty app to earn Pitchforks you can redeem for VIP tickets to athletics and arts events, only-at-ASU experiences, exclusive Sun Devil merchandise and more. Download the app from the App Store or Google Play, or find out more here.

Please feel free to contact Mary Zhu via email at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!

February 2018

February 2018

SMS Connects February 2018

This Month, Love for Science is in the Air

We welcome you to the February edition of SMS Connects, our monthly newsletter. Here at SMS, we hope that students and alumni alike are enjoying the highly-anticipated transition into spring (or, if you live here in Arizona, the jump directly into summer)!

As the semester continues, we are well on our way to Sun Devil Giving Day 2018. It will be our sixth annual day of giving, when we celebrate and encourage gifts in support of Arizona State University. In the weeks leading up to Sun Devil Giving Day 2018, the School of Molecular Sciences will be showing our community just what your gifts can accomplish. Check out some of our recent news, student profiles, and our Facebook series on women in science, as well as much more on sms.asu.edu. We look forward to your participation on March 22, 2018!

Upcoming Events

  • On Saturday, February 24, 2018, the School of Molecular Sciences will participate in ASU’s Open Door event, welcoming families, students and the community to explore the innovative spaces accessible only to ASU students on the Tempe campus from 1-6 p.m. We will be set up on the Physical Sciences F-wing south plaza with an "electron race" where participants will race through the electron transport chain of photosynthesis as they encounter "molecular machine" obstacles and learn about photosynthesis. Also, our glassblower Christi Roeger will be demonstrating her fire art. We will have a musical flame thrower with various optics and chemistry demos and would love for you to come join us.

  • The Spring 2018 Eyring Lecture will be happening in March. The Spring 2018 speaker is Professor David Baker from the University of Washington. The title of his General Lecture is "Prediction and Design of Protein Structures and Functions" and it will be held on March 29, 2018, 6:30pm in PS H151.

Research Highlights

Catching Up With Our Emeritus Faculty

Michael O'Keeffe

Michael O'KeeffeAfter retiring in 2004, Michael O’Keeffe has enjoyed working with other scientists on problems related to chemical structure. Since then he has published over 100 papers with co-authors from a dozen different countries. His papers are currently cited over 8000 times a year. In 2010, he was third on the list of world chemists whose work had the greatest impact in the previous decade. He has given many invited talks at universities and conferences world-wide, including in January 2017, where he delivered the inaugural lecture at Ireland’s new flagship center for science and technology, the Bernal Institute. In 2013, he was Distinguished Professor at the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). In January 2018, he celebrated 55 years at ASU.

Jim Birk Jim Birk

Jim Birk's recent activities have involved collaborations with two groups. He has been working on the 5th edition of "Introduction to Chemistry" with Pam Marks and Rich Bauer. This book is now printed and available from McGraw-Hill. His other collaboration is with a former graduate student, Ellen Yezierski, who is a professor at Miami University of Ohio. Their most recent project is "Combining Novel Visualizations and Synthesis to Explore Structure-Property Relationships Using Cobalt Complexes". A paper based on this project has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Chemical Education.

Carleton Moore

Carleton MooreThis year's ACS topic is "Chemistry in Outer Space," which is right down Carleton's alley. When he finished his analyses of 200 Apollo lunar samples, everything, including ceramic crucibles with fused samples, was returned to NASA. No souvenirs. But now, many meteorite pieces of Lunar and Martian samples have been found on the Earth's surface, so he has purchased some of these samples and put together a "Touch the Moon, Mars and Asteroid Vesta” Outreach Program.

It is also interesting to note that some of the most cited papers reported by Research Gate are those with his co-author, graduate student Matt Pierce, on the adsorption of arsenic on iron hydroxide. It seems their work is useful for cleaning arsenic out of drinking water.

Dennis Lohr Dennis Lohr

Dennis and Nita moved to Hawaii when he retired. He has always been interested in climate, and so is taking climate classes and attending seminars in the UH School of Oceanography (a top 10 in US department). Dennis is also writing a memoir about his years in Africa teaching in the Peace Corps. He is keeping busy with barely any time to surf on his paddle board. Dennis tells us, "I read the School newsletter and it seems like you all are doing great things, making us Emeriti proud. Keep up the good work!"

Thank you to our emeritus faculty for keeping us in the loop!

SMS Students Are Amazing!

Did you know that we recently published a series of profiles on some of our amazing undergraduate students in the molecular sciences? You can read some interesting stories about six of our current students, Sidney Covarrubias, Jacob Jordan, McKenna Renfro, Adam Samuel, Shannon Sipes, and Logan Tegler, on our Facebook or our Undergraduate Experience page.

SMS Spotlight on Women in Science

Have you visited our Facebook page recently? We have been publishing a series of photos that shine a spotlight on our community’s diverse population of brilliant and successful women, to encourage, and empower the aspirations of our current students.

SMS Women in Science

Amazingly enough, all the women we feature are beloved members of our SMS community! Are you a proud graduate of the School of Molecular Sciences who wants to participate? Contact us via Facebook or email your photo to asusms@asu.edu!

We appreciate every single one of your contributions, as only you can help this project to support more women in science succeed!

SMS Openings

As always, all job postings from faculty positions, instructor positions, student jobs, to non-ASU positions are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.

Please feel free to contact Mary Zhu via email at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!

School of Molecular Sciences

January 2018

January 2018

SMS Connects January 2018

Welcome back!

Welcome back to campus for the start of another new semester! We hope everyone had a safe and happy winter break. Read about our new staff members, one of our very impressive alumna, and research publications from our professors below. Don't forget to submit your photos to participate in our Women in Science project as well.

Sun Devil Giving Day 2018 is just around the corner. It will be our sixth annual day of giving, when we celebrate and encourage gifts in support of Arizona State University. Over the next two months, we here at the School of Molecular Sciences will be showing our community just what your gifts can accomplish. We look forward to your participation on March 22, 2018!

What's New at SMS

  • Please welcome our new Academic Success Specialist, Kim Denning. Kim, who grew up in Tempe, earned her Bachelor of Arts in German from Arizona State University, including a Sun Devil study abroad program in Regensburg, Germany. She earned a Master of Arts in Education in Adult Education and Distance Learning from University of Phoenix, and a Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership from University of Phoenix. Kim will be replacing Milton Corbin. 

  • Ara Austin, who received her PhD in Chemistry from SMS, joins us this semester as a Clinical Assistant Professor. Ara will be managing the online Biochemistry Program, which launched in fall 2017.  This new degree program represents an ideal opportunity for working professionals to earn a rigorous natural science degree in an online environment, that is a gateway to a wide range of careers in science and health. Biochemistry is the only online degree program in the sciences offered at ASU that includes real hands-on laboratory experience, which will ensure the program's credibility and competitiveness.

Research Highlights

  • In a 2017 perspective article published in the journal American Chemical Society Energy Letters, Arizona State University professor Dan Buttry and his group in the School of Molecular Sciences describe new methods that have the potential to reduce these energy costs by more than half. The article was recently acknowledged as one of the most read in this journal in 2017. Buttry, graduate student Joseph Rheinhardt, associate research scientist Poonam Singh and associate research professor Pilarisetty Tarakeshwar are developing efficient and cost-effective carbon capture technologies that use innovative electrochemical techniques to separate the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from other emissions from power plants. Trapping carbon dioxide this way allows it to be collected for transportation and/or burial or permanent sequestration, in order to prevent its accumulation in the atmosphere.

  • A team of Arizona State University and Harvard scientists has invented a major new advance in DNA nanotechnology. Dubbed “single-stranded origami” (ssOrigami), their new strategy uses one long noodle-like strand of DNA, or its chemical cousin RNA, that can self-fold — without even a single knot — into the largest, most complex structures to date. Hao Yan, a co-inventor of the technology, director of the ASU Biodesign Institute’s Center for Molecular Design and Biomimetics and the Milton Glick Professor in the School of Molecular Sciences, says, “I think this is an exciting breakthrough, and a great opportunity for synthetic biology as well.”

  • Anikki Giessler, a chemical engineering student at Arizona State University’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, won one of the poster session awards at the 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Conference. Giessler highlighted research completed under Alexandra Ros, an associate professor at ASU’s School of Molecular Sciences.

Meet Iolanda Klein, SMS PhD Graduate and R&D Engineer at Intel

A graduate of ASU’s School of Molecular Sciences, Iolanda Klein received her PhD in Physical Chemistry in 2016. While here, she worked with Professor C. Austen Angell on synthesis and characterization of solid state electrolytes for application in fuel cells and lithium batteries and other projects. Iolanda currently works for Intel as a Research and Development Engineer for the Materials Technology Development team. She tells our readers about her time at SMS and how it led her to her current career below:

Iolanda Klein

On her PhD research:
I was very lucky to work with Professor Austen Angell on several interesting projects. I worked on synthesis and characterization of solid state electrolytes for application in fuel cells and lithium batteries, and also in fundamental studies of glass forming liquids. Professor Angell is an excellent adviser, treating his students with respect and care; I believe this has a very positive impact in the success of a Ph.D. student. The projects I was involved on resulted in 2 patents and publications in high impact journals. Because ASU has so many great resources, I was able to get actual hands-on experience in a vast range of techniques: XRD, FTIR and Raman, electrochemical methods, NMR, and others, to cite a few. This kind of exposure as a student provided me a huge competitive advantage when transitioning to industry.

About deciding on her career path:
I was always very interested in breadth of knowledge. I love solving scientific problems, but the nature of the problem or the tool used to solve it can vary. I always like having different projects to juggle with, which pointed me in the way of industry R&D, due to the fast-paced environment and constant change in technology. I decided early on in my Ph.D. that I would like to pursue the corporate route. Today, I am a Research and Development Engineer at Intel. I started my time at Intel in Failure Analysis, which required a very broad range of chemistry knowledge and tool usage; recently, I moved to R&D Engineering for the Materials Technology Development team, where I am currently working on new thermal interface materials.

Iolanda's advice for current graduate students:
My advice is two-fold: First, don't give up, even when the times seem most dire. Those will happen to everyone on their academic path. Getting a Ph.D. is very difficult and challenging, and at times it might seem like your colleagues are having an easier time than you, but don't be fooled: everyone is going through the same challenging path. If you need help, don't hesitate to use ASU's counselling and guidance resources, which are plentiful. Be honest with your adviser, he/she is there to help you succeed. Second, try to expose yourself to a varying array of science, tools, professors, students, and resources while you are at school. Learn new techniques, talk to your peers – you never know when that knowledge will come handy, like it does to me all the time in industry! And finally, go Devils!

SMS Spotlight on Women in Science - Photo Submissions Needed

The School is working on ways to help women in our programs to be successful. This year we launched a new SMS Women in Molecular Science Scholarship, and now we are embarking on an exciting new project, to create a video that will showcase some of the amazing women in our community. Some of the most impactful members of our community are our women in science! We want to create a video that shines a spotlight on our community’s diverse population of brilliant and successful women, to encourage, and empower the aspirations of our current students.

SMS Women in Science

To make this work we need your help. We are asking for photo submissions from our female alumni to help showcase the power of women in science. We will be assembling your photos into a video that will serve as inspiration for our current students, and that will demonstrate the commitment of the School to the ASU charter, of being measured not by whom we exclude, but by whom we include and how they succeed.

For more details about this project, please click on this link that will take you to our photo submission post on our Facebook page. We appreciate every single one of your contributions, as only you can help this project to support more women in science succeed!

SMS Openings

As always, all job postings from faculty positions, instructor positions, student jobs, to non-ASU positions are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.

Please feel free to contact Mary Zhu via email at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!

December 2017

December 2017

SMS Connects December 2017

Congrats to Our Fall 2017 Grads

Fall 2017 Commencement was held on December 11, 2017. Congratulations to all of the successful graduates, especially all new alumni from the School of Molecular Sciences! We hope you go on to do amazing things and continue to spread your love for science. You can view some photos from graduation here.

We hope everyone is having a safe and happy holiday season, and enjoying the beautiful desert winter weather as much as possible. For our students, we hope you enjoy a well-deserved break and we look forward to seeing you back on campus next semester.

Meet Some of Our Graduates

The School of Molecular Sciences boasts a very impressive cohort of undergraduates and graduates alike. Some of our students were showcased in a series of commencement profiles for fall 2017 and others even won awards.

Shundene Key

Shundene is graduating with her B.S. in biochemistry. She was nominated by the School of Molecular Sciences as a CLAS Student Leader and is an accomplished member of our community. She says the "aha!" moment in her life that led her to study biochemistry was at a small Tribal college in Kansas. "After taking my first chemistry class, I knew I had to transfer to a university that offered more programs, and ASU was it." This fall, Shundene joins a long line of other family members who also received their degrees from ASU!

Chris Gisriel

We have introduced Chris previously in our newsletter's community profiles series, but this month he has been featured in a series of profiles leading up to commencement. Chris graduates with his doctorate in biochemistry after excelling in research and recently publishing in Science, and will start his post-doctoral position in January at ASU working with professor Petra Fromme's group. We are sure that Chris, whose favorite spot on campus is his lab, will continue find success in his research on photosynthesis and sustainable energy in the years to come.

Jonathan Vie

Jonathan was named the School of Molecular Sciences' Fall 2017 CLAS Dean's Medalist.

Jonathan Vie His major is biochemistry with a certificate in Secondary Teaching in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and General Science.

From CLAS: "Vie is a transfer student who has excelled in his studies at ASU. He joined the Marine Corps to help pay for college and has since discovered his passion for teaching. He has been a tutor for high school students while pursuing his degree and is dedicated to helping young students grow in the STEM fields within the Phoenix area.

Future Plans: He has completed his student teaching in the Phoenix Unified High School District and plans to continue teaching there after graduation."

“Recognizing the shortage of enthusiastic, qualified teachers in STEM fields in Arizona and role models for young Latino men in the Phoenix area, the School of Molecular Sciences is particularly proud to be able to train Mr. Vie to take on these roles and responsibilities. We have no doubt he will continue to serve the Valley community well,” said the nomination committee from the School of Molecular Sciences.

News from Our Community

  • We welcomed forty K-12 students from the Ironmen Network back onto the campus during Homecoming. They also toured the Magnetic Resonance Research Center (MRRC) including the spider lab. Many thanks to Brian Cherry, Samrat Amin and Jeff Yarger.
  • On November 17, Meena Rustagi brought her Payson High School Class of 30 to visit SMS. In the morning the students toured the “Science is Fun” lab with Jessica Hauer, the Ion Beam lab of Barry Wilkens, Material Science Lab of David Wright, the Electron Microscopy facility with Karl Weiss and were entertained with a spectacular series of chemical demonstrations by Jim Klemaszewski entitled “What chemistry is all about.” The students also toured our glassblowing facility, where they were impressed by the dexterity of Christine Roeger, and the Magnetic Resonance Research Center (MRRC).
  • Kirstin Hendrickson recently conducted a science outreach activity at Phoenix Christian School, teaching the 8th grade students about chromatography, trapping carbon dioxide gas in soap bubbles, and extracting DNA from strawberries. Phoenix Christian School has posted a video of the classroom experience.

Research Highlights

  • SMS professor Steve Pressé has received a prestigious Scialog Award. Pressé, along with Michelle Digman from UC Irvine and Bo Sun from Oregon State University, have formed a collaboration to screen novel metabolic and rheological (i.e., flow) markers within an invading group of cancer cells. Specifically they aim to determine the probabilities of a cell belonging to a certain type within the invading tumor, and also determine how to eliminate leading cells, as well how new leaders are “elected.” Pressé, Digman, and Sun formed their collaboration at the most recent Scialog: Molecules Come to Life conference organized by the private foundation Research Corporation for Science Advancement (RCSA). “Our lab will be using this award to develop machine learning tools to understand cancer growth,” explained Pressé.
  • Professors Hao Yan and Neal Woodbury from Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute and colleagues from Harvard and MIT are exploring new methods to capitalize on nature’s light-harvesting secrets. Their new study outlines the design of a synthetic system for energy gathering, conversion and transport that may point the way to innovations in solar energy, materials science, nanotechnology and photonics.
As always, you can find the most recent updates from the School of Molecular Sciences on our News & Research page.

SMS Spotlight on Women in Science - Photo Submissions Needed

The School is working on ways to help women in our programs to be successful. This year we launched a new SMS Women in Molecular Science Scholarship, and now we are embarking on an exciting new project, to create a video that will showcase some of the amazing women in our community. Some of the most impactful members of our community are our women in science! We want to create a video that shines a spotlight on our community’s diverse population of brilliant and successful women, to encourage, and empower the aspirations of our current students. 

Women in Science

To make this work we need your help. We are asking for photo submissions from our female alumni to help showcase the power of women in science. We will be assembling your photos into a video that will serve as inspiration for our current students, and that will demonstrate the commitment of the School to the ASU charter, of being measured not by whom we exclude, but by whom we include and how they succeed.

For more details about this project, please click on this link that will take you to our photo submission post on our Facebook page. We appreciate every single one of your contributions, as only you can help this project to support more women in science succeed!

SMS Openings

As always, all job postings from faculty positions, instructor positions, student jobs, to non-ASU positions are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.

Please feel free to contact Mary Zhu via email at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!

November 2017

November 2017

SMS Connects November

The Leaves are Changing Colors!

Greetings from the School of Molecular Sciences as we start to wind down another successful semester. To recap last month, Homecoming 2017 was a blast, the Eyring Lectures delivered by Professor Richard Schrock were informative and impressive, and several of our professors have published new research and received awards.

Did you know that we recently launched a new Community Profiles page? You can read more about SMS community members and even watch short videos of some of our amazing students. In case you need to catch up on last month's newsletter, we also have an SMS Connects archive page available for your enjoyment, anytime, anywhere!

Homecoming 2017

ASU Homecoming was held Saturday, October 28, and SMS was out in force welcoming thousands of campus visitors.

Homecoming 2017

Members of the Student Affiliates of the American Chemical Society along with instructors, grad students and faculty were, amongst many demos, freezing bubbles with dry ice and demonstrating various changes of state with the help of liquid nitrogen. This was complemented by a "hands-on" demonstration of the science of slime by Scott Sayres and his graduate students.The students also made multi-colored "elephant's toothpaste", which is made by the iodide-catalyzed degradation of hydrogen peroxide. Young kids got their Club ASU passports stamped as they watched burning dollar bills and were thrilled by exploding hydrogen balloons and methanol cannons. The exploding hydrogen balloons and various luminous demos, were more spectacular in the dark thanks to the late kickoff of the football game.

Many thanks to the volunteers, Jacob Jordan, Scott Sayres, Ashli Morgan, Darcy Kimball, Micah Wimmer, Jacob Garcia, Ehsan Gharib-Nezhad, Tim Lamb, Lauren Heald, Shaun Sutton, Manuel Guzman, Maddie Howell, Mary Zhu, Jenny Green, Jim Klemaszewski and Jeremy Mills who worked tirelessly all day.
You can view additional photos from Homecoming 2017 in our Homecoming 2017 Facebook Album.

Meet Brandon Nabozny, SMS Alum, Forensic Scientist, and ASU Faculty Member

This month, say hello to Brandon Nabozny, who received his B.S. in Biochemistry in 2006 and his M.A. in Criminal Justice in 2010, both from ASU. Brandon is an SMS graduate who worked with our own professor Ian Gould and is now a Supervising Forensic Scientist with the Arizona Department of Public Safety Crime Lab as well as Adjunct Faculty in ASU’s School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, where he teaches Intro to Criminal Investigations (CRJ 210). 

Brandon Nabozny Brandon has been working in forensic science for 11 years and currently supervises the Forensic Field Services Unit, which manages all the functions of the crime lab that work outside the lab. After two years teaching a forensics course at Estrella Mountain Community College, Brandon now teaches an Intro to Criminal Investigations course at ASU.

When asked about his time as a student here, Brandon reflected on his memories of going to the LRC and talking chemistry with his peers, as well as sitting in Professor Gould’s office working through reactions during many an office hour. Brandon credits his biochemistry degree as being particularly useful especially at the beginning of his career, saying, “I was a full-blown chemist using GCMS and LCMS every day. I often had to interpret those results and present them in court – without my background in chemistry it would be hard for me to interpret or understand toxicology or pharmacology and be able to talk about that to a jury.”

Brandon’s advice for current students who may be thinking of going into this field is, “Don’t be afraid to start at the very bottom and be humble at first...If you work hard, you’ll end up where you want to end up!”

You can read other stories from our interesting and diverse community here.

Research Highlights

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education has named Ariel Anbar, a President’s Professor in Arizona State University’s School of Earth and Space Exploration and School of Molecular Sciences, to its first-ever list of “Teaching Innovators.”  Anbar’s learning philosophy and teaching approach, which earned him this award, is to view science education as not just mastery of what is known, but also as exploration of the unknown. He leads a team that pioneers the use of new digital technologies to put exploration at the center of the learning experience in large enrollment classes. 
  • Professor Stuart Lindsay and his research team have published new findings on first evidence of a protein that could conduct electricity like a metal in the advanced online edition of the Institute of Physics journal Nano Futures.  The results have demonstrated that fundamental quantum forces are work to explain the way the integrin protein was behaving in the experiments. Next, Lindsay wants to explore other medically important proteins and measure their behavior using the solid-state nanodevices.
  • Changing the way the nation generates and consumes energy is at the heart of a new NSF grant awarded to Arizona State University and Kevin Redding, professor in the School of Molecular Sciences and director of the Center for Bioenergy and Photosynthesis (CB&P). The goal of Redding and his research group is to obtain industrial scale algal hydrogen production, a goal that requires an improvement over current technology by at least five-fold.

As always, you can find the most recent updates from the School of Molecular Sciences on our News & Research page.

Calling All Future Scientists!

The School of Molecular Sciences is now recruiting graduate students for entry in Fall 2018. The School offers graduate students unique research opportunities that transcend the traditional boundaries, and training to be successful, independent modern scientists.

ASU is the largest university in the U.S., with over $500M in research expenditures annually and is one of the fastest growing research enterprises in the U.S. ASU has been ranked as the #1 School in the U.S. for innovation for the last three years, ahead of Stanford (#2) and MIT (#3). A Science Watch article ranked chemistry departments worldwide in terms of the impact of their publications measured in citations. ASU was number six, ahead of MIT, UC Berkeley, Stanford and Yale. The School also ranks highly in terms of publications in the highest visibility journals, such as Science and Nature.

If any members of our community know of talented undergraduates who are prepared for a challenge and are looking for a contemporary training in modern molecular science, please help them learn more about the opportunities available in the SMS here:

SMS Openings

As always, all job postings from faculty positions, instructor positions, student jobs, to non-ASU positions are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.

Please feel free to contact Mary Zhu via email at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!

October 2017

October 2017

SMS Connects October 2017

Homecoming Week is Here!

Say hello to the spookiest month of the year! Halloween is just around the corner, and so is Homecoming 2017. Some of our undergraduates representing the Student Affliates of the American Chemical Society (SAACS) chapter at the School of Molecular Sciences will have a booth at the annual ASU Homecoming Block Party on Saturday, October 28th, 2017. Come watch exciting chemistry demonstrations and cheer on the ASU Sun Devils as they scare off the USC Trojans at Sun Devil Stadium!

This Month's Events

  • The Fall 2017 Eyring Lecture Series will be held on Thursday, October 19th, and Friday, October 20th, 2017. This semester's lectures will be delivered by Nobel Laureate Richard Schrock, the Frederick G. Keys Professor of Chemistry at M.I.T. Schrock will be delivering a General Lecture on Thursday entitled "A Discovery and a Nobel Prize 30 years Later" and a Technical Presentation on Friday entitled "Recent Advances in Olefin Metathesis by Molybdenum and Tungsten Catalysts."

    We welcome SMS alumni to join us for Professor Schrock's reception before his General Lecture. The reception will be held on Thursday, October 19th, 5:00pm to 6:15pm at the University Club in the Heritage Dining Room. Please RSVP for this event by sending an email to asusms@asu.edu.

  • Join us for Homecoming 2017 on Saturday, October 28th! Members of the Student Affiliates of American Chemical Society are headed by president Jacob Jordan this year. SAACS along with Jim Klemasewski, Scott Sayres, and his graduate students are gearing up to be part of ASU's huge Homecoming Block Party. In addition to food and music, the block party will feature tents housing dozens of ASU units, each on hand to participate in the festivities. Alumni, students and the community are invited to attend the block party to learn more about what is happening at ASU. 

Meet Chenxiang Lin, SMS Alum and Yale University Assistant Professor

This month, we introduce a new feature to our newsletters, updates from School of Molecular Sciences alumni. Chenxiang Lin is an SMS Ph.D. graduate who worked with Professor Hao Yan and is now Assistant Professor of Cell Biology at Yale University.

Chenxiang Lin Chenxiang came to SMS to pursue a Ph.D. in Chemistry in 2005, after graduating from Peking University. At ASU, Chenxiang joined Hao Yan’s lab, where he tackled many challenging projects related to nanotechnology. Hao said, “The reason why Chenxiang is one of the most productive students (he has more than 10 first author papers published) in my group is that he always thinks about control experiments carefully before doing them…I am very proud of him.”

After completing his Ph.D., Chenxiang said, “My graduate studies in the School of Molecular Sciences and The Biodesign Institute at ASU allowed me to mature as a scientist and have prepared me well for my future career.”

Chenxiang worked as a postdoctoral research fellow at Wyss Institute at Harvard University before moving on to his current position as Assistant Professor of Cell Biology at Yale University, where his lab develops DNA nanotechnology-enabled “high-precision tools” for cell biology studies. He says, “One of my long-term goals is to help DNA nanotechnology become a commonly used technique in life science research (just like molecular cloning or fluorescence microscopy). The other potential application of our work is in synthetic biology, such as building synthetic organelles.”

When asked what it’s like to head his own laboratory, Chenxiang commented, “Being an independent PI is like running a small business – I need to secure funding, advertise our science, and manage personnel and supply chain. But more importantly, I am having a lot of fun working on interesting projects with my team and collaborators. Building and running my own lab also makes me reflect back upon my graduate study at ASU, where I witnessed Prof. Yan launching his independent career so brilliantly.”

In his spare time, Chenxiang likes to play basketball, table tennis, Pictionary, and KanJam with his lab. The School of Molecular Sciences is proud of Chenxiang's accomplishments. His success reflects favorably on the SMS graduate program.

Research Highlights

  • Congratulations to Professor Ranko Richert, who is the recipient of a 2018 Gauss Professorship from the University of Göttingen, Germany. The Gauss Professorship was established to commemorate the achievements of the famous German mathematician and scientist Carl Friedrich Gauss, on the 100th anniversary of his death, and is awarded to scientists who have made outstanding contributions in one of Gauss' primary fields of interest: astronomy, geophysics, mathematics, and physics. Gauss Professors are invited to give lectures and seminars in an effort to cultivate the exchange of scientific ideas. Professor Richert will spend several weeks in Göttingen next summer, where he will collaborate with Professor Konrad Samwer.

  • A team of ASU scientists led by Professor Alexandra Ros in the School of Molecular Sciences and the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery, has been just the second user group to conduct experiments at the brand new European X-ray free electron laser facility (EuXFEL) in Hamburg, Germany. This 1.5-billion-dollar facility is the third, and by far the most powerful, X-ray laser in the world. After ten years of construction, it opened for first experiments just a month ago. The XFEL best known to US scientists has been the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) facility where the now-famous work on crystallography of protein nanocrystals (by the ASU team led by Professors John Spence and Petra Fromme) was carried out. The coming-on- line of the new facility, with its giant 2.6-mile accelerator tunnel and atomic length scale resolution, will offer grand new possibilities in the physical sciences as well.
As always, you can find the most recent updates from the School of Molecular Sciences on our News & Research page.

Calling All Future Scientists!

The School of Molecular Sciences is now recruiting graduate students for entry in Fall 2018. The School offers graduate students unique research opportunities that transcend the traditional boundaries, and training to be successful, independent modern scientists.

ASU is the largest university in the U.S., with over $500M in research expenditures annually and is one of the fastest growing research enterprises in the U.S. ASU has been ranked as the #1 School in the U.S. for innovation for the last three years, ahead of Stanford (#2) and MIT (#3). A Science Watch article ranked chemistry departments worldwide in terms of the impact of their publications measured in citations. ASU was number six, ahead of MIT, UC Berkeley, Stanford and Yale. The School also ranks highly in terms of publications in the highest visibility journals, such as Science and Nature.

If any members of our community know of talented undergraduates who are prepared for a challenge and are looking for a contemporary training in modern molecular science, please help them learn more about the opportunities available in the SMS here:

SMS Openings

As always, all job postings from faculty positions, instructor positions, student jobs, to non-ASU positions are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.

Please feel free to contact Mary Zhu via email at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!

September 2017

September 2017

September 2017

Happy Fall!

Even though temperatures are still blazing here in the desert, fall is just around the corner! We hope everyone is having a safe, successful, and stimulating semester now that classes are in full swing. This month's newsletter has information about an upcoming Eyring Lecture Series delivered by Nobel Laureate Richard Royce Schrock, a visit to our students from alumna Martha Medina, as well as new job opportunities at SMS and beyond.

Nobel Laureate Richard Schrock to Deliver Fall Eyring Lectures

Richard R. SchrockOur Fall 2017 Eyring Lecturer is F. G. Keyes Professor of Chemistry at M.I.T. and Nobel Laureate, Dr. Richard Royce Schrock. In 2005, Professor Schrock received the Nobel Prize in chemistry, with Robert H. Grubbs and Yves Chauvin, for his work in the area of olefin metathesis, an organic synthesis technique. Professor Schrock will be delivering two lectures: the first is a general lecture on Thursday, October 19th, 2017, 6:30pm in PSH-150, titled "A Discovery and a Nobel Prize 30 Years Later"; the second is a technical presentation on Friday, October 20th, 2017, 3:40pm in PSH-151, titled "Recent Advances in Olefin Metathesis by Molybdenum and Tungsten Catalysts."

You can find more information about Professor Schrock's research and the Eyring lectures here. Please come join us for this exciting event!

A Visit from Our Alumna

Martha Medina and Janet MyersOn Thursday, August 31, Dr. Martha Medina (left), a graduate of the School of Molecular Sciences who is currently Vice President of International Sales at 21st Century HealthCare, Inc., came to speak with students about her time at ASU and her career path after receiving her Ph.D. in biochemistry from ASU in 2004. She worked at Procter & Gamble’s science division and held other industry positions before joining 21st Century HealthCare. Although international sales may not be the first career field that comes to mind for students pursuing a chemistry or biochemistry degree, Dr. Medina assured students that chemistry remains the basis of her work. Her doctorate degree has led her all around the world - she travels frequently for her job and is going to Tanzania for the first time this fall!

Her colleague, Dr. Janet Myers (right), also presented information on two paid internship opportunities at 21 st Century HealthCare’s Red Rock Laboratories, one in Fall 2017 and one in Spring 2018, for ASU undergraduates majoring in chemistry and biochemistry. Interested students should contact the SMS undergraduate advising office to learn more.

We welcome any SMS alumni like Dr. Medina who are interested in sharing their stories, internship, or mentorship opportunities with our students to reach out to us.

Research Highlights

As always, you can find the most recent updates from the School of Molecular Sciences on our News & Research page.

SMS Openings

As always, all job postings from faculty positions, instructor positions, student jobs, to non-ASU positions are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.

In Memoriam

It is with great sadness that we report the recent passing of two of our colleagues

John Holloway
John Holloway  (pictured), geochemist, was professor for 38 years at ASU. John's research covered the range from explosive volcanism to the nature of minerals in the deep Earth and Mars, to abiotic synthesis in seafloor hydrothermal systems ("black smokers"). 

John C. Knight , Research Professor, former Assistant Professor, and former Assistant Director of the ASU-CRI, passed away from lung cancer Tuesday afternoon, September 5, 2017. Professor Knight was an expert in organic, medicinal, and natural products chemistry, as well as mass spectrometry, all focused in anticancer drug discovery. 

Please feel free to contact Mary Zhu via email at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!

August 2017

August 2017

SMS Connects August 2017

Welcome, Class of 2021!

As part of the fall welcome event, five faculty members from the School of Molecular Sciences gave an exciting and colorful introduction to chemistry demonstration for our 240 freshmen future molecular scientists on Tuesday, August 15, 2017.

Anne Jones, Marcia Levitus, Ian Gould, James Klemaszewski, and Gary Cabirac set fire to hydrogen balloons, made “Elephant’s Toothpaste,” dazzled with colorful chemistry in solution and in flames, and created a spectacular indoor cloud of water using liquid nitrogen, to show our incoming Chemistry and Biochemistry majors the beauty and majesty of chemistry.

Fall Welcome 2017

Check out all our photos from the event as well as a video of the chemistry demonstrations!

Meet One of Our New Students!

Megan Murphy is an incoming freshman who will study Biochemistry at SMS. She loves to travel, has visited 13 different countries, and has an open-minded and appreciative view of the world around her. In fact, traveling is what brought her to ASU: “While traveling to Italy, I met a group of people from California… most of them were attending Arizona State University in the fall. Now, 3 years later, I am so proud to call myself a Sun Devil.”

Megan Murphy

This summer, Megan participated in our Early Start Program, a two-week immersive experience that she calls “an amazing way to meet your professors, faculty, and friends. The mentors and faculty have been such an amazing help with preparing me for what is to come over my next four years at ASU.”

Megan says, “College is a place where you can grow responsible, figure out who you are, and of course, a place to learn. No matter what major you end up choosing, I believe that you should be passionate about what you do in life!”

You can encourage more women like Megan to pursue a degree and career in the molecular sciences with a contribution to the SMS Women in Science Scholarship program, here.

You can see photos of other students in our Early Start Program here.

2017 Helios Scholars at TGen

Three undergraduate Biochemistry students from the School of Molecular Sciences participated in the 2017 Helios Scholars at TGen summer internship program, where they conducted biomedical research under the mentorship of a TGen (Translational Genomics Research Institute) scientist, attended educational seminars, learned about career options in bioscience, and practiced scientific writing and research presentation skills. Victoria Oladoye, Alex Follette, and Sidney Covarrubias all gave poster presentations showcasing their project results at the TGen 2017 Intern Symposium on July 28, 2017. Victoria's research was on childhood leukemia, Alex's research was on canine lung tumors, and Sidney's research was on the infectious disease Melioidosis.

Research Highlights

As always, you can find the most recent updates from the School of Molecular Sciences on our News & Research page.

SMS Openings

All job postings are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.

Please feel free to contact Mary Zhu via email at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!

July 2017

July 2017

SMS Connects July 2017

Welcome!

First, we would like to thank you all for the warm response to our new newsletter format! We hope you are all enjoying the summer sunshine. This month's newsletter showcases some recent happenings at SMS and our first personal story from our community.

Nation's First Online Biochemistry Degree

The School of Molecular Sciences launches the first fully online degree in Biochemistry from an accredited institution in the U.S. The new degree program will start in Fall 2017, although online courses in general and organic chemistry were already piloted during the 2015-2016 academic year.

Online students will take formal lecture-style courses, but will also gain valuable hands-on technical skills via laboratory courses that students will take in an accelerated format, on campus during the summer. This new degree program represents an ideal opportunity for working professionals to earn a rigorous natural science degree in an online environment, that is a gateway to a wide range of careers in science and health. Biochemistry is the only online degree program in the sciences offered at ASU that includes real hands-on laboratory experience, which will ensure the program's credibility and competitiveness.

Research Highlights

SMS Alumni Survey Results

Thank you to everyone who participated in our SMS Alumni Survey! Our initial survey results indicate high interest in career and professional services as well as continued updates about SMS via our newsletter and website. We have started by revamping our alumni page to include sections for community news, upcoming events, and job opportunities at SMS.

We would also like to encourage our community to help our current students gain more professional experience via internships. If you or your company are interested in recruiting or outreach at SMS, please contact us.

Congratulations to the five winners of our Amazon gift card drawing, Gabriel, Zhen, Thomas, Samantha, and Kelli!

Student Story of the Month

Beginning this month, we will be featuring some stories from members of our community. This month's story comes from Chris Gisriel, one of our current Ph.D. students, a U.S. military veteran, and recipient of a 2017 CLAS Graduate Excellence Award. Chris studies how photosynthesis has evolved since oxygen first entered Earth's atmosphere.

Chris Gisriel"After a deployment in Afghanistan with the US military, I discovered my interest in biology and chemistry during a couple of semesters at community college, which led me to begin studying biochemistry at ASU. As an undergraduate, I was able to perform research in Professor Kevin Redding's lab. During my first visit, I remember being impressed by the fact that they froze microorganisms in liquid nitrogen for storage.

My work with Professor Redding and other members of his lab, as well as my experiences taking classes such as Biophysical Chemistry with Professor James Allen, greatly enhanced my undergraduate experience at the School of Molecular Sciences. After finishing my undergraduate degree, I decided to continue my education at ASU. I am now a fourth-year student in the Biochemistry Ph.D. program and hope to graduate this fall. I have had many positive experiences with the SMS faculty and often feel as though I stand on the shoulders of giants."

You may be interested in supporting the SMS Veterans Scholarship, which aims to help undergraduates who are military veterans or children of veterans to pursue a degree and career in the molecular sciences.

SMS Openings

All job postings are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.


As always, you can find the most recent updates from the School of Molecular Sciences on our News & Research page.

Please feel free to contact Mary Zhu via email at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!

 

June 2017

June 2017

SMS Connects June 2017

Welcome to SMS Connects!

SMS Connects replaces our traditional bi-annual newsletter and represents a more responsive way to communicate with our alumni and other members of the molecular sciences community. We hope that you will look forward to receiving regular SMS news and updates in this format.

Spring Graduates

The School of Molecular Sciences would like to extend congratulations to our  Spring 2017 graduates! You can find a full list of graduates and their accomplishments here.

Student Highlights

  • Patrick Almhjell, an SMS Biochemistry major minoring in Psychology and Biological Sciences, has been awarded the Spring 2017 CLAS Dean’s Medal for his academic excellence.
  • Capria Rinaldi, an SMS Medicinal Biochemistry major, has received the School of Molecular Sciences 2017 Distinguished Biochemistry Merit Award and has excelled in research. She is featured in a series of profiles for Spring 2017 Commencement. 
  • Several of our graduate students have also been recognized by ASU’s College of Liberal Arts and the ASU Graduate and Professional Student Association for their research accomplishments, mentorship activities, and community participation.​

Faculty News

The work of the SMS Junior faculty is attracting national attention.  Assistant Professors Ryan Trovitch, Gary Moore, Alex Green, and Nick Stephanopolous have all recently received national awards for their research and scholarship.

Our Survey

A friendly reminder: Please complete the SMS alumni survey that was sent last week by the end of the day, Tuesday, June 13th. We are interested in finding ways to better serve our alumni community, but we need your help to plan our future programs. Respondents to our five question survey will be entered into a drawing to win one of five $20 Amazon Gift Cards! If you have yet to do so, we urge you to take two minutes out of your day and help your peers by completing the survey. If you have deleted your link to the survey, please send an email to asusms@asu.edu.

Upcoming Events

On Saturday, June 17, the ASU Alumni Association is hosting a Sun Devil Business Expo, an opportunity to network and learn about local valley businesses. A calendar of other ASU Alumni Association events is available here.

SMS Openings

SMS currently has openings for the following positions:

  • Postdoctoral Research Associate
  • General Chemistry Instructor

All job postings are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.


As always, you can find the most recent updates from the School of Molecular Sciences on our News & Research page.

Please feel free to contact us via email at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!