Jia Guo

PSC -C255
PHYSICAL SCIENCE CENTER
TEMPE
Assistant Professor
Faculty
TEMPE Campus
Mailcode
1604

Biography

Jia Guo received his B.S. degree from the University of Science and Technology of China, and his Ph.D. degree from Columbia University. After doing postdoctoral research at Stanford University, he joined Arizona State University, where he is currently an assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry. His research focuses on the development of single cell genomics and proteomics technologies with novel fluorescent probes, which will enable the systematic analysis of the identities, positions and abundances of a large number of different biological molecules in individual cells in structured tissues. The goal is to explore the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, and transform their diagnosis and therapy to enable personalized medicine.

Education

  • Ph.D. Chemistry (with distinction), Columbia University 2009
  • B.S. Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China 2005

Research Interests

Our laboratory focuses on developing single cell genomics and proteomics technologies with novel fluorescent probes, which will enable the systematic analysis of the identities, positions and abundances of a large number of biological molecules in individual cells. Using these approaches, we will investigate complex biological systems including cancer progression, neuronal function and stem cell differentiation. The highly interdisciplinary nature of our research program spans chemistry, biology, engineering and computer science.

Detailed understanding of cancer progression, neuronal function and stem cell differentiation requires quantitative measurements of their gene expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Due to the intrinsic heterogeneity of cancer cells, neurons and stem cells, conventional genomics and proteomics technologies carried out on pools of cells mask gene expression variations and spatial complexity of biomolecules in a population. Other single cell based methods are limited by a small number of parallel analyses, which makes them undesired to study complex gene regulatory networks. To address these issues, we will develop single cell genomics and proteomics technology to study the spatial organization of a large number of genes in the nucleus and the transcriptional and translational profiles of these genes simultaneously in single cells. With the high throughput analyzing capability, single-molecule sensitivity, and spatial preservation of molecules in cells, this approach will be used to explore the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases, identify new biomarkers, detect diseases at their early stages, and develop more effective cellular targeted therapies.

Publications

  • M. Mondal, R. Liao, C. Nazaroff, A. Samuel, and J. Guo*. “Highly multiplexed single-cell in situ RNA and DNA analysis with bioorthogonal cleavable fluorescent oligonucleotide probes” Chem. Sci. In press.
  • L. Xiao, and J. Guo*. “Single-cell in situ RNA analysis with switchable fluorescent oligonucleotides” Front. Cell Dev. Biol. In press.
  • M. Mondal, R. Liao, and J. Guo*. “Highly multiplexed single-cell protein analysis” Chem. Eur. J. In press. 
  • E. N. Tóth, A. Lohith, M. Mondal, and J. Guo, A. Fukamizu, N. Pourmand. “Single-cell nanobiopsy reveals compartmentalization of mRNAs within neuronal cells” J Biol Chem, In press.
  • M. Mondal, R. Liao, L. Xiao, T. Eno, and J. Guo*. “Highly multiplexed single cell in situ protein analysis with cleavable fluorescent antibodies” Angew Chem Int Ed. 56, 2636-2639 (2017)       
  •                            Highlighted as hot paper in Angew Chem Int Ed
  •                            Highlighted in ACS Chem Biol
  • M. Mondal, and J. Guo*. “Comet-FISH for ultra-sensitive strand-specific detection of DNA damage in single cells” Method Emzymol. 591, 83-95 (2017)
  • L. Xiao and J. Guo*. Multiplexed single-cell in situ RNA analysis by reiterative hybridization. Analytical Methods. 7, 7290-7295 (2015)
  • J. Guo, P. C. Hanawalt, and G. Spivak. Comet-FISH with strand-specific probes reveals transcription-coupled repair of 8-oxoGuanine in human cells. Nucleic Acids Res. 41, 7700-7712 (2013)
  • J. Guo, J. Ju and N. J. Turro. Fluorescent hybridization probes for nucleic acid detection. Anal Bioanal Chem. 402, 3115-3125 (2012)
  • J. Guo, S. Wang, N. Dai, Y. N. Teo and E. T. Kool. Multispectral labeling of antibodies with polyfluorophores on a DNA backbone and application in cellular imaging. PNAS. 108, 3493-3498 (2011)
  • J. Guo, L. Yu, N. J. Turro and J. Ju. An integrated system for DNA sequencing by synthesis using novel nucleotide analogues. Acc Chem Res. 43, 551-563 (2010)
  • J. Guo, N. Xu, Z. Li, S. Zhang, J. Wu, D. H. Kim, M. S. Marma, Q. Meng, H. Cao, X. Li, S. Shi, L. Yu, S. Kalachikov, J. Russo, N. J. Turro and J. Ju. Four-color DNA sequencing with 3'-O-modified nucleotide reversible terminators and chemically cleavable fluorescent dideoxynucleotides. PNAS 105, 9145-9150 (2008)

Courses

Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
CHM 231Elementary Organic Chemistry
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
CHM 231Elementary Organic Chemistry
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
CHM 231Elementary Organic Chemistry
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
BCH 561Adv Topics in Biochemistry
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
CHM 231Elementary Organic Chemistry
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
BCH 561Adv Topics in Biochemistry
Spring 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
CHM 231Elementary Organic Chemistry
Fall 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
BCH 501Current Topics in Biochemistry
BCH 561Adv Topics in Biochemistry
Fall 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
CHM 598Special Topics
BCH 598Special Topics

Service

  • NSF, Review Panelist (2014 - Present)
  • ASU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, committee on Safety, member (2014 - Present)
  • Faculty/Scientific Advisory Committee for High Resolution Mass Spectrometry, Member (2014 - Present)
  • Undergraduate programs and awards committee, Member (05/2015-present)