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SMS Connects
 
December 2018
SMS Connects December 2018

Congratulatons to SMS Fall 2018 Graduates!

Today, December 11, 2018 ASU celebrated it’s Fall 2018 Graduation. The School of Molecular Sciences would like to congratulate its graduates on all of their hard-earned academic accomplishments. This fall, the School of Molecular Sciences graduated 85 students overall, including 7 doctoral students, 2 with a Master’s degree, 2 with a 4+1 Master’s degree and 74 undergraduate students awarded either Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees in chemistry, biochemistry, medicinal chemistry, or environmental chemistry. Our students have worked hard to complete their rigorous and fulfilling studies and we are proud of their countless achievements. We look forward to their continued success!

Click here to view a full list of the fall 2018 graduates.

Click here to view some photos from the graduation.

Meet Some of Our Graduates:

Alexis Ramirez-Dean’s Medal

Biochemistry major

Accomplishments: After transferring to ASU from Mesa Community College with his associate degree, Ramirez quickly distinguished himself in his coursework and research. As a student in Barrett, The Honors College at ASU, his honors thesis focused on developing a dielectrophoretic method to separate gold nanoparticles.

Outside of honors classes, Ramirez worked in the Dillard’s Distribution Center as well as at the university as a laboratory technician. He also served as an academic advocate and tutor this fall to at-risk high school students in Chandler.

Adwa Alhatlan, Saudi Arabia

Biochemistry major

Moving from Saudi Arabia to London, Adwa Alhatlan set out to pursue her pre-med studies on a scholarship. Only shortly thereafter she found out she needed to make a back-up plan in order to pursue her academics on her scholarship at another university.

Little did she know her plan B would bring her to ASU by way of Washington State. Alhatlan transferred from Washington to ASU to get her degree in biochemistry. After graduation, Alhatlan hasn’t made any plans just yet, but she’s not ruling out medical school or getting her masters. Right now Alhatlan is seeing where life takes her.

Diana Francis, Iraq, Tempe

Biochemistry major

Diana Francis always knew she wanted to study science, but it wasn’t until she took a biology and chemistry class that she realized a Biochemistry degree would be perfect for her.

Growing up in Iraq, Francis didn’t speak any English when she came to the U.S. in 2010.

In the fall of 2019 Francis will head to University of Arizona in Phoenix to start her Doctor of Pharmacy program. 

Darian Takase, Hilo, Hawaii

Biochemistry major

Darian Takase had lots of options to choose from when it came time to decide where she would go to college. In an unconventional approach, she put all the names on a slip of paper and pulled one from a bowl. Just like she became a Sun Devil!

With influence from her grandfather who is a physician, Takase majored in Biochemistry and will apply to medical school in 2019. In the mean time she will continue as researcher at the Precision Neuro Therapeutic Lab at the Mayo Clinic.

Jin Wook Chung, South Korea

Chemistry major

Jin Wook Chung transferred from East Tennessee State after two years to ASU to study chemistry. Chung wanted to be at a bigger school with more opportunities for education and research. During his time at ASU, Chung was able to learn basic lab skills in the Keck Bioimaging lab and work at work at Banner Health in their pathology lab.

Chung was inspired at an early age to become a physician after his mother’s breast cancer diagnosis and his grandmother developed Alzheimer’s disease.

Matthew Dietz, Phoenix, AZ

Dual major in Biochemistry and Kinesiology with a minor in Business.

Matthew Dietz thought he’d pursue a career in athletics, but the curiosity of science and his own childhood experiences as patient changes his course.

When Dietz enrolled at ASU he decided to take academics seriously and this lead to not one major, but two. Dietz will graduate with degrees – Biochemistry and Kinesiology and a minor in Business. After graduation, Dietz plans attend medical school.

Farewell to Congressman Ed Pastor, SMS Chemistry Graduate

When Edward Lopez Pastor graduated with a bachelor’s in chemistry (1966) from what was then the department of chemistry at ASU he went on to teach high school. Little did he know back then that he would go on to be Arizona’s first Mexican American U.S. Congressman for an illustrious 23 years. Pastor died on November 27, 2018.

In Congress he championed the North American Free Trade Agreement, immigration and education reforms, and universal health care. In 1993 he introduced a resolution “expressing the sense of Congress that access to basic health care services is a fundamental human right.” Sadly the resolution never moved out of committee.

“There was no one more capable, hardworking and kind,” said Senator Jeff Flake of Arizona.

https://publicservice.asu.edu/pastor

Research Highlights

A new light on significantly faster computer memory devices

In an article published online on November 30, 2018 in Science Advances, a team of scientists from Arizona State University's School of Molecular Sciences and Germany offer an explanation of how a particular phase-change memory (PCM) material can work a thousand times faster than current flash computer memory, while being significantly more durable with respect to the number of daily read-writes.

Watch: Regents' Professor C. Austen Angell breaks down the new findings

SMS opens the door to high school students

On November 17, Meena Rustagi brought her Payson High School chemistry class of 25 to visit SMS. In the morning the students toured the “Science is Fun” lab with Jim Klemasewski and his interns and were entertained with a spectacular series of chemical demonstrations entitled “What chemistry is all about.” This was followed by a tour of the Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopes where the students participated in some” hands on” activities.  The Magnetic Resonance Research Center (MRRC) was next on the list where the spiders were a big hit. Last but not least was a tour of the Biodesign Institute.

To learn more about community or K-12 outreach opportunities, please contact ASUSMS@asu.edu.

Employment Opportunities

Lecturer in Chemistry position at School of Molecular Sciences

The School of Molecular Sciences (SMS) invites applications for a full-time, nine month Lecturer position to begin with an anticipated start date of August 2019. This is a full-time, benefits-eligible, non-tenure eligible position. This is renewable on an academic year basis (Aug 16 – May 15), contingent upon satisfactory performance, availability of resources, and the needs of the university.

As always, all job postings are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.

Happy Holidays!

We hope everyone is having a safe and happy holiday season, and enjoying the beautiful desert winter weather as much as possible. For our students, we hope you enjoy a well-deserved break and we look forward to seeing you back on campus next semester.

Please feel free to send email to ASUSMS@asu.edu at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!

School of Molecular Sciences


SMS Connects

 Nevember 2018

SMS Connects Nevember 2018

Greetings from the School of Molecular Sciences!

We are currently beginning to wind down after an extremely successful semester. Homecoming 2018 was inspirational as were the series of Eyring Lectures given by Professor Sunny Xie. Many of our faculty have recently published high impact research and received awards.

Ros receives Innovation Award

Alexandra Ros has received the Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies Innovation Award for her paper and presentation, “Electrically Triggered Water-in-Oil Droplets for Serial Femtosecond Crystallography.”

Unravels key mysteries of spider silk

Jeff Yarger and his research team are celebrating their recent success on the path to understanding what makes the fiber that spiders silk — weight for weight — at least five times as strong as steel, in a recent article published in PNAS.

Calling All Future Molecular Scientists!

The School of Molecular Sciences is now recruiting PhD students for the Fall 2019 entry. The School offers graduate students unique research opportunities that transcends the traditional boundaries, and offers the training to be successful, independent modern scientists.

  • All students fully funded
  • Application deadline: January 1, 2019

Learn more...

Research Highlights

ASU professor wins grants to elucidate the magic of proteins

For Arizona State University’s Dmitry Matyushov, professor in the School of Molecular Sciences (SMS) and the Department of Physics, years of studying how electrons make their way through some important protein molecules has been recently rewarded with two major grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Energy (DOE).

ASU geoscientists discover an overlooked source for Earth's water

Where did Earth's global ocean come from? A team of Arizona State University geoscientists led by Peter Buseck, Regents' Professor in ASU’s School of Molecular Sciences and School of Earth and Space Exploration (SESE) has found an answer in a previously neglected source. The team has also discovered that our planet contains considerably more hydrogen, a proxy for water, than scientists previously thought.

Tying the knot: New DNA nanostructures

In new research appearing in the journal Nature Communications, Hao Yan, a researcher at Arizona State University, and his colleagues Fei Zhang and Xiaodong Qi and others describe a method for coaxing segments of single-stranded DNA into complex 2D and 3D knotted structures.

Read more News & Research...

Homecoming 2018

ASU Homecoming was held Saturday, November 3, and we welcomed thousands of visitors to campus. Members of the “Science is Fun” program with Jim Klemasewski were in attendance, demonstrating freezing bubbles with dry ice and the various changes of state with the help of liquid nitrogen. This was complemented by a "hands-on" demonstration of the science of slime by Scott Sayres and his students. Jeremy Mills was also in attendance.

Young kids got their Club ASU passports stamped as they watched burning dollar bills and were thrilled by exploding hydrogen balloons and methanol cannons.

Christine Roeger, (scientific glassware designer and supervisor of the glassblowing facility), also joined in the fun with her fire art demonstrations every 30 minutes throughout the day. She impressed her large audiences with her skills, keeping them in awe for hours as she made barometers in the shape of swans, and teapots, amongst other catching objects.

View our Homecoming 2018 photos on Facebook

Employment Opportunities

Lecturer in Chemistry position at School of Molecular Sciences

The School of Molecular Sciences (SMS) invites applications for a full-time, nine month Lecturer position to begin with an anticipated start date of August 2019. This is a full-time, benefits-eligible, non-tenure eligible position. This is renewable on an academic year basis (Aug 16 – May 15), contingent upon satisfactory performance, availability of resources, and the needs of the university.

Assistant Professors of Chemistry (Organic and Biochemistry) at Ball State University

As always, all job postings are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.

Please feel free to send email to ASUSMS@asu.edu at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!

School of Molecular Sciences


SMS Connects
October 2018
SMS Connects May 2018

Dear SMS Community,
ASU Homecoming is just around the corner!

Alumni, students and the community are invited to attend ASU's Homecoming Block Party on Saturday, November 3, 2018. Members of the "Science is Fun" group as well as the Student Affiliates of the American Chemical Society (SAACS) with Jim Klemasewski, Jeremy Mills, Scott Sayres and his graduate students are gearing up to present some exciting demos. In addition to food and music the block party will feature tents with informative presentations from different academic units across the ASU campus.

Michael O’Keeffe wins Aminoff Prize in Crystallography

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has announced that ASU Regents' Professor Mike O’Keeffe and Omar Yaghi, ex-ASU faculty member now at UC Berkeley, have won the prestigious Gregori Aminoff Prize in Crystallography for 2019, “for their fundamental contributions to the development of reticular chemistry."

Nicholas Stephanopoulos receives 2018 NIH New Innovator Award

ASU Professors Nicholas Stephanopoulos, assistant professor in the School of Molecular Sciences, and Rizal Hariadi, assistant professor in the Department of Physics, both researchers in the Biodesign Center for Molecular Design and Biometrics, were announced as recipients of the 2018 NIH New Innovator Award.

Fall 2018 Eyring Lecture Series (October 24- 25, 2018)

The Fall 2018 Eyring Lecture Series will be held on Wednesday, October 24 (3:30 PM in Biodesign Auditorium BDB105) and Thursday, October 25, (6:00 PM in PSH-153) 2018. This semester's lectures will be delivered by Sunney Xie, the Mallinckrodt Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard, and the Cheung Kong Visiting Professor at Peking University, Biodynamics Optical Imaging Center (BIOPIC).

  • Wednesday, 10/24 3:30 PM
    Technical Presentation:"Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy: Seeing the Invisible in Biology and Medicine"
    Biodesign Auditorium BDB105

  • Thursday, 10/25/2018 6:00 PM
    General Lecture: "Life at the Single Molecule Level: From Single Molecule Enzymology to Single Cell Genomics"
    PSH-153

Please note that the days and times of these lectures are different from the traditional Eyring lectures schedule.

More seminar information

Research Highlights

  • SMS professors explore carbon’s next frontier with Keck Foundation funding

    Anne Jones and her team of Peter Buseck, Scott Sayres, Tim Steimle and Tara Pilarisetty received a $1 million award from the Keck Foundation together with additional ASU matching funds to lead an ASU effort to further explore carbon’s potential.
  • First experiments at Europe's new X-ray laser reveal structure of antibiotic-disabling enzyme

    The international collaboration led by the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, or DESY, with participation from Arizona State University’s School of Molecular Sciences, has announced the results of the first scientific experiments at the European XFEL. The pioneering work not only demonstrated that the new research facility can speed up experiments by an order of magnitude, it also revealed a previously unknown structure of an enzyme responsible for antibiotic resistance.
Read more about our Recent Accomplishments.

Meet Online Biochemistry Student Tawny Noelle: #RNtoMD


"Going back to school requires an incredible shift in mindset. It requires a passion and desire to alter the way you live your life and start again.

As a peri-operative registered nurse, I work with surgeons and anesthesiologists every day. I observe the doctor to patient interactions and am always amazed by the knowledge and the skillset used to repair anatomy in the operating room. Inspired by my own career and realizing that surgery is something I want to do in the future, I decided that I had to go to school again.

Outside of work, I am a pageant competitor, CPR instructor, and WNBF athlete. When it came to school, one of my priorities was to maintain my identity as a registered nurse while going to school. Having patient interaction and using the science-based skills I’ve learned as an undergraduate was something I didn’t want to drop completely. Discovering an online program to complete my post-baccalaureate degree made it possible for me as a registered nurse to create a pathway to perhaps become a surgeon one day."

Read more community profiles

Employment Opportunities

  • SMS chemistry and biochemistry Assistant Professor 

    The School of Molecular Sciences at Arizona State University invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track position as Assistant Professor of chemistry and biochemistry with an anticipated start date of August 2019. 
  • Chemjobber

    Chemjobber is a website that helps chemists find jobs in a tough market. This is a valuable resource you can use to search for chemistry positions in the industrial and academic fields.
As always, all job postings are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.

Please feel free to send email to ASUSMS@asu.edu at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!

We look forward to seeing you at our Homecoming booth and the Fall 2018 Eyring Lecture Series.

School of Molecular Sciences


SMS Connects
September 2018

Sep2018

Dear SMS Community,

The "SMS Connects" newsletter is back! We’re already a month into our 2018-’19 academic year and this seems like an excellent time to showcase the activities of our faculty, staff, students and alumni.

Everett Shock honored with prestigious award from ACS 

The American Chemical Society (ACS) has announced that Arizona State University's Everett Shock will be awarded their prestigious 2019 Geochemistry Division Medal.

Innovative in-person lab provides unique opportunity for online students

This summer SMS launched a new in-person accelerated organic chemistry lab course that offers online B.S. biochemistry students the same experience as traditional on campus students.

Our Faculty

Read more about our Recent Accomplishments.

Our graduate students

Read more about Our Students.

Our Alumni

Please visit our "Community Profile" page to read more stories about our alumni.

Employment Opportunities

As always, all job postings are listed on our Employment Opportunities page.

Please feel free to send email to ASUSMS@asu.edu at any time with questions, concerns, or suggestions. You can visit our website at sms.asu.edu or connect with us by liking our Facebook page!

 

Have a great semester!

School of Molecular Sciences